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The following literary works, references or authors have been mentioned or shown in the series to date. Please see their main articles for details; this page is primarily for listing.

Books and literature

After All These Years

After All These Years
See main article: After All These Years
By: Susan Isaacs
Lost References:
Afterall


Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
By: Lewis Carroll
Lost References:
  • Locke mentions this novel when speaking to Jack about the symbolic "white rabbit" (his father's elusive image); it is also the title of the episode. ("White Rabbit")

Alice


Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret

Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret
See main article: Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret
By: Judy Blume
Lost References:
  • Sawyer is seen reading this book; he says it's "Predictable. Not nearly enough sex," when Sun approaches him. ("The Whole Truth")

Areyoutheregod


Atlas Shrugged

Atlas Shrugged
See main article: Atlas Shrugged
By: Ayn Rand
Lost References:

Bad Twin

Bad Twin
See main article: Bad Twin
By: Laurence Shames (Ghostwriting for metafictional character, Gary Troup)
Lost References:
Badtwin


Bible

Bible
See main article: Bible
Lost References:

Bible


A Brief History of Time

Brief History of Time, A
See main article: A Brief History of Time
By: Stephen Hawking
Lost References:

BriefHistoryTime


The Brothers Karamazov

Brothers Karamazov, The
See main article: The Brothers Karamazov
By: Fyodor Dostoevsky
Lost References:

The Brother Karamazov


Carrie

Carrie
See main article: Carrie
By: Stephen King
Lost References:

Carriebook


Dirty Work

Dirty Work
See main article: Dirty Work
By: Stuart Woods
Lost References:
DirtyWork


The Epic of Gilgamesh

Epic of Gilgamesh, The
See main article: The Epic of Gilgamesh
Lost References:

GilgameshTablet


Harry Potter

Harry Potter
By: J.K. Rowling
Lost References:

HarryPotter


Heart of Darkness

Heart of Darkness
By: Joseph Conrad
Lost References:
  • Jack asks Kate "Tell me something, how come every time there's a hike into the heart of darkness you sign up?" when Kate volunteers to go on the boar hunt with Locke. ("Walkabout")
  • Charlie tells Hurley, "One minute you're happy-go-lucky, good-time Hurley, and the next you're Colonel bloody Kurtz!" ("Numbers")
    • Colonel Kurtz is a character in the 1979 film Apocalypse Now, which is loosely based on Heart of Darkness.

HeartofDarkness


Hindsight

Hindsight
See main article: Hindsight
By: Peter Wright
Lost References:
Hind


I Ching

I Ching
Lost References:

IChing


Island

Island
By: Aldous Huxley
Lost References:
  • The Pala Ferry alludes to Pala, the fictional island of this novel's title. ("?")

IslandHuxley


Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar
By: William Shakespeare
Lost References:
  • Sawyer says to Locke, "You too, Brutus?" ("Two for the Road")
    • This is a reference to the famous quote, "Et tu, Brute?", which are Caesar's last words in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.

JCaesar


Lancelot

Lancelot
See main article: Lancelot
By: Walker Percy
Lost References:
Lancelot


Laughter in the Dark

Laughter in the Dark
See main article: Laughter in the Dark
By: Vladimir Nabokov
Lost References:
Laughter


Lord of the Flies

Lord of the Flies
See main article: Lord of the Flies
By: William Golding
Lost References:
  • This novel is mentioned by Sawyer. "Folks down on the beach might have been doctors and accountants a month ago, but it's Lord of the Flies time, now." ("...In Translation")
  • Charlie mentions how the Tailies went "all Lord of the Flies." ("What Kate Did")

LordOfTheFliesBookCover


The Mysterious Island

Mysterious Island, The
See main article: The Mysterious Island
By: Jules Verne
Lost References:

Themysteriousisland


Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, An
See main article: Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge
By: Ambrose Bierce
Lost References:
  • Locke is shown holding this book upside down, in the Swan, flipping through the pages as if he's trying to find loose papers between them. ("The Long Con")

An occurrence


The Odyssey

Odyssey, The
See main article: The Odyssey
By: Homer
Lost References:

Odyssey


Of Mice and Men

Of Mice and Men
See main article: Of Mice and Men
By: John Steinbeck
Lost References:

OMAM


Our Mutual Friend

Our Mutual Friend
See main article: Our Mutual Friend
By: Charles Dickens
Lost References:

BOOK


The Outsiders

Outsiders, The
By: Susan E. Hinton
Lost References:
  • In the flashback scene in the van, Hurley's friend Johnny says to him, "Stay gold, Ponyboy." This is a reference to the Outsiders and this phrase being used in the book is, in turn, a reference to the Robert Frost poem "Nothing Gold Can Stay". ("Everybody Hates Hugo")

Theoutsiders


Rainbow Six

Rainbow Six
See main article: Rainbow Six
By: Tom Clancy
Lost References:

RainbowSix


Stranger in a Strange Land

Stranger in a Strange Land
See main article: Stranger in a Strange Land (book)
By: Robert Heinlein
Lost References:

SIASL


A Tale of Two Cities

Tale of Two Cities, A
By: Charles Dickens
Lost References:

Tale


The Third Policeman

Third Policeman, The
See main article: The Third Policeman
By: Flann O'Brien
Lost References:

Thethirdpoliceman


To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird
See main article: To Kill a Mockingbird
By: Harper Lee
Lost References:

Mockingbirdfirst


The Turn of the Screw

Turn of the Screw, The
See main article: The Turn of the Screw
By: Henry James
Lost References:

Theturnofthescrew


Watership Down

Watership Down
See main article: Watership Down
By: Richard Adams
Lost References:
  • Kate finds Sawyer sitting on the beach reading this book. Boone said that he was reading it while on vacation in Australia. According to Sawyer, the book had just washed ashore. ("Confidence Man")

Watershipdown


The Wizard of Oz

Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The
See main article: The Wizard of Oz
By: L. Frank Baum
Lost References:
  • Henry Gale is the name of Dorothy's uncle. When initially captured, Ben (then insisting his name was "Henry Gale") claimed to have come to the Island in a balloon, as did the Wizard. The real Henry Gale apparently did.

Wizardofoz


A Wrinkle in Time

Wrinkle in Time, A
See main article: A Wrinkle in Time
By: Madeleine L'Engle
Lost References:

Wrinkle1


Referenced authors

Hemingway, Ernest vs. Dostoevsky, Fyodor

  • Locke and Ben both mention him in comparison to Dostoevsky (who wrote The Brothers Karamazov, see above).
  • There are no real life references to Hemingway being jealous of Dostoevsky's work or feeling in his shadow. This may have been made up for the show for dramatic effect.

King, Stephen

Li Bai

  • An early Tang Dynasty (618-907) poem by Chinese poet Li Bai, "Third Eye Ascended in Dreams" is seen as calligraphy in flashbacks of Jin and Sun's home.
  • See link for a complete English translation.
  • The content itself is surreal, being about a man who journeys far in a dream as though in a vivid parallel dimension, only to be abruptly awoken to the mundaneness and bitterness of reality. This is a paradox uncovering that dreams can be better at revealing the truth than reality.

Musset, Alfred de

  • Locke attempts to recreate his brief sighting of the blast door map on a page from a 1939 book of poems by Alfred de Musset, called Sur les Débuts de Melles Rachel et Pauline (On the Beginnings of Miss Rachel and Miss Pauline).

Roman Authors Quoted on the Blast Door Map

Recurring themes

Sawyer reads

Sawyer reads or references books in several episodes:

Watershipdown LordOfTheFliesBookCover Wrinkle1 Lancelot Areyoutheregod JCaesar Badtwin OMAM

See also

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